The grass is always greener when traveling to a new destination but in the African savannah, it is getting down and dirty with nature. Take on completely different kind of David Attenborough style adventure in Africa with a visit to a wildlife reserve. It offers opportunities to do the unusual that will never be forgotten.

Each country in Africa has their own specialty with safaris tailored for families and even for the traveler who seeks a bit of luxury.

One of the main reasons for going to Africa is to see the wildlife up close in their natural habitat. Africa has the best of all regions, from the coast to the lakes to the deserts and even mountains.

For animal lovers, there are reserves and National Parks teeming with African wildlife. Just say ‘Jambo’ and be greeted with a warm welcome in the African Continent and gain a picture perfect memory.

The grass is always greener when traveling to a new destination but in the African savannah, it is getting down and dirty with nature. Take on completely different kind of David Attenborough style adventure in Africa with a visit to a wildlife reserve. It offers opportunities to do the unusual that will never be forgotten.

Each country in Africa has their own specialty with safaris tailored for families and even for the traveler who seeks a bit of luxury.

One of the main reasons for going to Africa is to see the wildlife up close in their natural habitat. Africa has the best of all regions, from the coast to the lakes to the deserts and even mountains.

For animal lovers, there are reserves and National Parks teeming with African wildlife. Just say ‘Jambo’ and be greeted with a warm welcome in the African Continent and gain a picture perfect memory.

Chobe National Park, Botswana

Chobe National Park, Botswana
Photo: ¡ssoɹ ☮ / Flickr

This reserve is the third in size in Botswana but is jammed packed with interests.  Botswana, home to the Chobe National Park and Okavango Delta is near to the stunning Victoria Falls and is dominated by the Kalahari Desert. The park is broken into three distinct areas, each with its own personality and charm.

It is a country offering a different and slightly off the beaten track experience and is best known for its spectacular elephant population.   It is considered an area with the highest concentration of elephants in Africa estimated at over 50,000. Expect to see other animals especially during annual migration of zebras, giraffes and vast species of birds and predators.

Kruger National Park, South Africa

Zebra, Kruger National Park, South Africa
Photo: Chris Eason / Flickr

Expanding its footprint further into South Africa, Kruger National Park is situated where two rivers meet on the border with Mozambique. The exclusive game-rich biodiversity on two million hectares contains diverse life forms such as the unique Euphorbia trees. It is a showcase of varied plant varieties that are unique to the rest of the world but are so abundant and thriving in this environment. The park is divided into six eco systems containing some of the rarest plants in the world.

With an impressive number of species, visitors gain the opportunity to spot many of Africa’s most well known wild animals. Established over a century ago to protect South Africa’s wildlife, there are nearly 150 species of mammals including lions and some on the endangered species list such as the African Dog.

Besides enjoying the highest concentration of wildlife and flora and fauna, Kruger National Park contains a number of archaeological sites dating from the Stone Age.  Having this on-site gives visitors an immersion of ancient and natural history.

Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve, Zimbabwe

Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve, Zimbabwe
Photo: Lwp Kommunikáció / Flickr

Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve is located on 130,000 acres of wilderness in the southern corner of Zimbabwe. Its Zimbabwean name of ‘Malilangwe’ translates as “Call of the Leopard.” The reserve is teeming with birds and wildlife, including the “Big Five.” The highest concentration of black rhino in Africa proclaims its territory at the reserve.

Rare and endangered species such as the sable antelope are located within the ‘Mopane’ woodlands. The ‘Banyini,’ in the centre of the reserve has the zebras, impalas and wildebeest who call it home. The lake attracts hippos and crocodiles as well as a variety of fish and water birds.

The region is just as diverse in terrain as it is in wildlife. The imposing Baobab trees convince you that you are not in your hometown. Dating back more than 2000 years, there are hundreds of rock formations. Many of which are covered with Stone Age paintings depicting hunters and wildlife in amazing clarity.

Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park, Zambia

Victoria Falls
Photo: Christiaan Triebert / Flickr

Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park is a small wildlife sanctuary near Livingston, Zambia. Despite its unimpressive size, it happens to be chocked full of interest including one of the impressive Natural Wonders of the World at its base.

‘The Smoke Which Thunders’ also known as Victoria Falls is the most iconic image of Africa. First discovered by Scottish explorer David Livingstone in 1855, this is the largest cascade of falling water in the world.

Choose to see this majestic waterfall from a number of ways when making base near Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park. Take a helicopter flight to get a bird’s eye view of Victoria Falls, or sail in a boat along the Zambezi or join a white water rafting expedition at the foot of the falls. The park does contain wildlife safaris with a guide. Visitors will easily come across hippos, zebras, crocodiles, elephant and giraffes as well as the endangered white rhino.

Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Lioness, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania
Photo: Filip Lachowski / Flickr

Everyone will be guaranteed sightings of big game in the 5,700 sq miles of the Serengeti region in northern Tanzania near the Kenyan border and Lake Victoria. More than 3,000 lions live in this ecosystem as well as the other members of the “Big Five” which include black rhinos, elephants, African Buffalo and African Leopard.

Each year the migration of 1.5 million wildebeest and quarter of a million each of zebra and antelope travel over a thousand miles across the Serengeti plains into Kenya.

This region has recently been named a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the visitor can chose catching a glimpse of wildlife with a guide on 4×4 routes, high off the ground in a hot air balloon or even by foot with a walking safari.

0 Comments

Flavor Some Animal Instinct in Africa

  1. For clarity, and to avoid confusion, you should point out Veronica that tourists don\’t go out on their own to these national parks. I visited all three of them and on excursions, people go in a covered or open jeep. There is no wandering around on their own. There are also strict rules in place. When staying over in one of the park huts, nobody is allowed outside after curfew. Not even to go for a drink of water or to go to the bathroom. A guide must always be present. That being said, there are night excursions when tourists go with the guide to see the animals or bugs. There is for instance a spider tour during which giant and colorful spiders are pointed out. Neither the animal nor the spider tours are for the faint of heart. Every year a number of people are injured, or killed and eaten. One should also take into consideration that the summer months (November to February) are extremely hot. 45 to 50 degrees C are not unusual.

    1. yes Conny1109Co – You bring out important factors. Africa is a vast place and very dangerous for one to trek on their own and should only go on a safari.These destinations can only be ventured with either a guide from the reserve/National Park or a private tour provided by a resort.

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